Sunday, February 7, 2010

Reading and Rain

The week ended with drenching 3.61" of rain in two very wet days. My heart goes out to those people whose hillsides did not stand whole.

The sun has set on Super Bowl 2010.

The bid to write the introduction to an art catalogue is submitted. Back to reading.

This is the title I found at Border's Books

"Women Who Read Are Dangerous" uses women depicted in compellingly haunting and beautiful images through the ages, reading. By Stefan Bollman- I can't imagine not LIKING this tome.

With more rain predicted this coming week, this is a light the fire, cuddle up under the comforter with a cup of hot cocoa in the living room and read until you fall asleep kind of treat.

Speaking of treats. Guess what I found searching the byroads of blogging.?VintageGardenGal.


The bloggess, Bonnie Manion, writes with authentic pleasure of gardening, home-grown food and vineyard lifestyle. Reading about her chickens, I discovered something about myself. As I commented back, "All my favorite homes to visit when I was a child ALL had chickens in their yards."

This absolutely lovely blog brought to me a sense of peacefulness: my spirit uplifted to a place of calm.

Bonnie was kind enough to allow me to post this photo from her blog. I had asked to use it with a chicken recipe- but I can't bring myself to use images of Julia, J.Lo, Fanny, and Coco at home in the garden as a lead in to roast chicken. That recipe can wait a day or two.

This is the exact link to Bonnie Manion's post at VintageGardenGal http://www.vintagegardengal.com/2010/02/04/chickens-in-the-garden/
You can sign up there for her newsletter, "Scoop from the Coop".

Sunset Image by Gene Sasse, Photographer of the Usual and Unusual. Studio (909) 941-3993



2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Oh Lydia,
That's wonderful!
I am loving to see you at peace and uplifted again!
Love the chickens in the yard too. Being from down in the country, flat lands of Arkansas many relatives had chicken coops in which they had nest for laying eggs but they roamed around free during the day. Would they be "free range" chickens?
My favorite cousin, Judy and I, when young, felt a wee bit naughty and stole a cigarette from my uncle's drawer and went out into Grandma Pipkin's chicken house to smoke it! Oh my Lord! Dumb little girls! Glad we didn't set it on fire!

Still trying to figure out why women who read are dangerous tho. LOL Sounds interesting!

Hugs, Trisha

Lydia said...

Ah, Trisha! So you were raised on 'Green Acres'? How delightful.
USDA regulations do not technically define either the farmer or consumer driven meaning of 'free range'. But in a nutshell- yes.